Announcing New IVS Full-service and Credit Recovery Courses for Summer and Fall!

Illinois Virtual School (IVS) is once again expanding options to meet the needs of Illinois students. IVS has had a long history of providing innovative and effective supplemental services to schools and families across Illinois in order to help guarantee access to high quality education for all public, private and homeschool students. IVS is proud to announce the addition of Physical Science and two electives to the Credit Recovery catalog for summer enrollment as well as Computer Concepts & Software Applications and Orientation to Health Occupations to the Full Service catalog. Both new Full Service courses are foundational courses required under ISBE’s College and Career Readiness CTE area matrices.

IVS will also be adding a full year Beginning Computer Programming course with plans to add an Intermediate Programming course later in 2016. These catalog enhancements are in direct response to school, parent and student feedback. In addition, many school districts are now requiring computer coding or training in information technology for their students; IVS is happy to fill these gaps for partner schools.

Courses

Program

Available Starting:

Physical Science-Sem 1 Credit Recovery Immediately
Physical Science-Sem 2 Credit Recovery Immediately
College and Career Prep 1 Credit Recovery May 20
College and Career Prep 2 Credit Recovery May 20
Computer Concepts & Software Applications Full-Service Aug 25
Orientation to Health Occupations Full-Service Aug 25
Beginning Computer Programming-Sem 1 Full-Service Aug 25
Beginning Computer Programming-Sem 2 Full-Service Jan 7
Intermediate Computer Programming Full-Service TBD

In the past year IVS Credit Recovery has proven to be a very popular option, helping students stay on track towards graduation through teacher managed, self-paced prescriptive content. The IVS Credit Recovery program is now at fourteen courses including: American Literature, Algebra 1, Algebra 2, Biology, British Literature, College and Career Prep 1, College and Career Prep 2, English 1, English 2, Geometry, US History and World History. The new Physical Science Credit Recovery course is available for immediate enrollment, College and Career Prep starting May 18. Credit Recovery remains at $70 per 10 week enrollment for the 2015-2016 school year.

Students ready to register
Visit http://ILvirtual.org to register.

For a complete list of IVS start dates visit the IVS website.

To explore our Full-service and Credit Recovery courses visit the IVS interactive course catalog.

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Survey: Most districts use cloud services

More than 65 percent of IT leaders say their district now uses productivity tools

A large majority of district technology leaders report moving some crucial IT services to the cloud this year, according to a March report from the Consortium of School Networking (CoSN).

More than 65 percent of IT leaders say their district now uses productivity toolssuch as Google Apps for Education that run through the cloud—a rapid increase over last year, when only 10 percent reported using these services, the 2015 “K-12 IT Leadership Survey Report” found.

Read More>> Survey: Most districts use cloud services | District Administration Magazine.

Does your school have devices for each student?

As published by the ACSD (Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development)

February 2011 | Volume 68 | Number 5
Teaching Screenagers Pages 78-79

A recent survey of 364 leaders of large districts with one-to-one initiatives found that 33 percent believed the laptops were having a significant effect on student achievement, and another 45 percent believed they were having a moderate effect (Greaves & Hayes, 2008). Of course, such self-reporting is prone to subjectivity. What does more objective research say about one-to-one initiatives?

The Encouraging News

More engaged learners. A four-year study of 5,000 middle school students in Texas found that those engaged in laptop immersion programs were less likely to have disciplinary problems (but slightly more likely to be absent from school) than students in schools without laptops (Shapley et al., 2009).

Better technology skills. The Texas study also found that the technology skills of students in the laptop programs improved significantly— so much so that after three years, low-income students in the laptop schools displayed the same levels of technology proficiency as wealthier students in the control schools (Shapley et al., 2009).

Cost efficiencies. Proponents of one-to-one programs also assert that such programs create savings in other areas, including reduced costs for textbooks, paper, assessments, and paperwork, as well as a reduction in disciplinary actions (Greaves, Hayes, Wilson, Gielniak, & Peterson, 2010).

The Discouraging News

Overall, however, most large-scale evaluations have found mixed or no results for one-to-one initiatives. After five years of implementation of the largest one-to-one initiative in the United States, Maine’s statewide program, evaluations found little effect on student achievement—with one exception, writing, where scores edged up 3.44 points (in a range of 80 points) in five years (Silvernail & Gritter, 2007). The evaluators speculated that the reason other subjects have not shown measurable improvement could be that the state assessment does not measure the 21st century technology skills that laptop initiatives promote.

An evaluation of Michigan’s one-to-one laptop program found similarly mixed results. It examined eight matched pairs of schools and found higher achievement in four laptop schools, lower achievement in three, and no difference in the final pair (Lowther, Strahl, Inan, & Bates, 2007).

The study of Texas middle school students referenced earlier found slightly higher student growth in mathematics, but no higher growth in reading for students in laptop programs (Shapley et al., 2009). And unlike in Maine, writing scores were actually lower (although not significantly so) for students in the laptop group; the researchers reasoned that students may have grown so accustomed to writing with computers that they had trouble adjusting to the pencil-and-paper format of the state test.

For the complete article visit >> “Research Says…”

To learn more about how Illinois Virtual School can partner with your school to provide a quality experience to go with your technology visit us at http:// www.ILVirtual.org

students with laptops
Students working in a 1-1 school